What started as a journey into the history of the Celtic Peoples has now expanded into the Ancient and Medieval times. I aim to look into the different peoples of these times and share their culture, history, language, and hopefully a few things I did not expect. Since I primarily study Europe, most of the posts I create will explore the people there. I hope that I will be able to bring in other posts that highlight other areas and peoples. Submissions are welcomed and greatly appreciated. I am open to questions and I shall try answer them to the best of my ability.

 

'Significant' Viking treasure found in Dumfries and Galloway

archaeologicalnews:

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A hoard of Viking treasure found in Dumfries and Galloway has been described one of the most significant archaeological finds Scottish history.

Early indication suggest there are over 100 artefacts, comprising several gold objects.

The hoard also included a…

Polish archaeologists discovered medieval bath in Albania

archaeologicalnews:

image

Polish archaeologists discovered a fourteenth-century bath in northwestern Albania. This is the oldest object of this type studied so far in Albania - told PAP Prof. Piotr Dyczek of the Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre of the University of Warsaw.

The greatest discovery this…

Cardiff Iron Age hill fort dig seeks 2,000 volunteers

archaeologicalnews:

A search for 2,000 volunteers for an archaeology dig at an Iron Age fort on the outskirts of Cardiff is under way by Cardiff University.

The Caerau hill fort near Ely is thought to have been occupied from the 5th Century BC by the Silurian tribe.

A dig last year involving 1,000 people found…

asatru-ingwaz:

Spearhead, Iron, Silver
Runic inscriptions on the silver coated socket read ‘Rane owns this spear’ and ‘Botfus carved’. Weapons with runic inscriptions are rare, and this one is decorated with silver which makes it one of a kind. The ornamentation is an example of a particularly fine craftsmanship.
Stor-Vede, Follingbo, Gotland, Sweden

Royal BC Museum Victoria, Canada

Archaeologists find evidence of possible Viking stronghold in Ålands

archaeologicalnews:

According to archaeologists aerial infrared images suggest the existence of a late Iron Age settlement, possibly the largest such find ever in the Åland Islands or all of mainland Finland.

The aerial imaging highlighted a depression 40 metres deep and 12 metres wide which might have been the site…

zubat:

Divers mapping underwater caves in Mexico’s Eastern Yucatán Peninsula came upon a surprising find: the skeleton of a young, prehistoric girl.

In 2007 divers mapping the underwater caves on Mexico’s Eastern Yucatán Peninsula, about 12 miles north of the city of Tulum, stumbled into a very large chamber that they named Hoyo Negro.

"The floor disappeared under us, and we could not see across to the other side," Alberto Nava of Bay Area Underwater Explorers.

About two months later, armed with powerful underwater lights, Nava and other diver colleagues reached the floor of Hoyo Negro at about 170 feet. They found themselves in a bell-shaped structure 200 feet in diameter, whose center was littered with large boulders stacked on top of each other.

"As our eyes got accustomed to the environment, we started to notice large animal bones resting at the bottom and on the walls of the pit," Nava said.

International researchers led by anthropologist James Chatters identified the remains of more than 26 large mammals. They included a gomphothere, an extinct elephant-like creature, which was dated to around 40,000 years ago, saber-toothed cats and giant ground sloths, which were largely extinct in North America by 13,000 years ago. Extant species included puma, bobcat, coyote, Baird’s tapir, collared peccary and a bear.

In a photo above, Nava inspects a forelimb of an extinct Shasta ground sloth, a species not previously found so far in the Americas, when one diver then spotted a human skull resting on the top of a small ledge. The small cranium lay upside down and rested on the left humerus (upper arm bone) with other remains nearby.

"It had a perfect set of teeth and dark eye sockets looking back at us. We could see the rest of the upper torso spread to the left and down on the ledge," Nava said.

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ancientpeoples:

Gold ring inscribed “FIDEM” on the bezel and “CONSTANTINO” on the hoop
4th Century AD
Roman
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Gold ring inscribed “FIDEM” on the bezel and “CONSTANTINO” on the hoop

4th Century AD

Roman

(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Statue of the Egyptian Goddess Isis
120-150 AD
Roman
Found in Rome
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Statue of the Egyptian Goddess Isis

120-150 AD

Roman

Found in Rome

(Source: The British Museum)

archaicwonder:

Scythian Gold and Turquoise Zoomorphic Handle, Southern Urals, c. 4th century BC
Scythian art combined Eastern elements with influences from the Hellenic states on the northern coast of the Black Sea. The principal feature of Scythian art is its use of a zoomorphic symbology.
The handle is formed of sheet gold, in two halves, hammered over a wooden mold and chased, in the form of a predator, perhaps a wolf, standing four-square, its head down, baring fangs, with clawed feet, the fur rendered as incised spirals, beading fringing the ears, with drop-shaped turquoise inlays on the shoulders and haunches, the interior of the ears also inlaid in turquoise, the bottoms of the feet and mouth once conforming to the curvature of a vessel wall, originally set vertically.
More about Scythian art

archaicwonder:

Scythian Gold and Turquoise Zoomorphic Handle, Southern Urals, c. 4th century BC

Scythian art combined Eastern elements with influences from the Hellenic states on the northern coast of the Black Sea. The principal feature of Scythian art is its use of a zoomorphic symbology.

The handle is formed of sheet gold, in two halves, hammered over a wooden mold and chased, in the form of a predator, perhaps a wolf, standing four-square, its head down, baring fangs, with clawed feet, the fur rendered as incised spirals, beading fringing the ears, with drop-shaped turquoise inlays on the shoulders and haunches, the interior of the ears also inlaid in turquoise, the bottoms of the feet and mouth once conforming to the curvature of a vessel wall, originally set vertically.

More about Scythian art

(Source: christies.com)

Vikings: Life & Legend

hedendom:

The British Museum are hosting their first Vikings exhibition in 30 years complete with new archeological finds, new interpretations of existing evidence and discussions lead by leading authorities on Viking practices, culture and religion.

There are also some fun, free resources available from the website:
- You can find some interesting articles on their blog.
- There is a guide to Viking place names throughout the UK.
- An explanation of the methods of constructing a Viking longship is here.
- A Viking name generator, complete with runic translation.

eadfrith:

ALL 4000 objects from the incredible Staffordshire Hoard laid out for study.  Images from the Staffordshire hoard website

The Staffordshire Hoard is the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found.

http://www.staffordshirehoard.org.uk/

Video: http://youtu.be/CcriG8UIRVI

archaicwonder:

Greek Chalcidian Type Bronze Winged Helmet, Circa 4th Century BC

 In relief on the brow a central gorgoneion flanked by griffins between contoured ribs, a moulded spiral on each temple with restored wings attached above, the helmet crown with median ridge and attached plate with three plume holders, with cheekpieces, restored.

archaicwonder:

Greek Chalcidian Type Bronze Winged Helmet, Circa 4th Century BC


In relief on the brow a central gorgoneion flanked by griffins between contoured ribs, a moulded spiral on each temple with restored wings attached above, the helmet crown with median ridge and attached plate with three plume holders, with cheekpieces, restored.

The surprising discovery of an Anglo-Saxon feasting hall

bythegods:

britishhistorypodcast:

The opening of that article is really misleading. Paganism lasted much longer than one or two generations in Anglo Saxon Royal circles. 100’s of years, in fact. And even longer among the lower classes.

But other than that quibble, this is a good read. 

I’m a big fan of this podcast, and an EVEN BIGGER FAN of archaeological discoveries relating to Anglo-Saxon kings!

Stay Pagan-Proud, Cerdic and co.!